CHRIS BROKAW - End of the Night - CD

95,00 kn

-+

Chris Brokaw is already a part of the Glitterbeat family. He was an original member of Dirtmusic, appearing on their self-titled debut and the Tamikrest collaboration "BKO." He has also made an indelible mark on rock music as a solo artist, as well as with his iconic bands Codeine and Come, and as a collaborator with Thurston Moore, Evan Dando, Stephen O’Malley, and many others. With "End of the Night," he has created an album of nocturnal, guitar-led instrumentals, featuring lush, indigo-tinged band arrangements. 

Boston-based Chris Brokaw has made an indelible mark on rock music both on his own as well as with his iconic bands Codeine and Come, and as a collaborator with Thurston Moore, Evan Dando, Stephen O’Malley, and many others. On End of the Night, he leads a group of renowned players to create an album of entrancing instrumentals. Featuring lush, indigo-tinged arrangements of horns and strings, the album expands on VDSQ’s solo acoustic spirit, evoking a sublime jazz mood appearing as the night passes into the early morning hours. The End of the Night was conceived based around a simple concept. Late one evening the musician and myself were listening to records at home. After many hours it got to the point where everything became completely still, the silence permeating the walls, reverberating. We agreed to listen to one more record, but what would it be? What music could answer that existential quandary of the perfect last record of the night at home? I instantly asked him to make me the very record we needed to hear at the moment, a record for the end of the night. Several years passed before the execution of the concept could take place but Brokaw was collecting notes in the back of his mind the entire time. I suggested collaborators like Greg Kelley (on Chet Baker style trumpet, knowing Brokaw’s strong affinity for that player) and Samara Lubelski (whom he played with briefly in Thurston Moore and the New Wave Bandits). Bringing in guests such as Lori Goldston, David Michael Curry, Luther Gray, Jonah Sacks, and Timo Shanko, each track has its own unique combination of small group formations (duos, trios, quartets) very much like jazz, both in instrumentation and mood, if not style or standards.